Priorities

Famous saying says “Time is money”.

It sounds too familiar. Often times, it’s too cheap to hear and it’s too easy to wave off, even.

But I can’ t agree more to stress about this to achieve my goals as in writing and life-wise in general.

A couple days ago, in the past mid-night, my professor sent an email to my fellow cohorts and I about an additional, non-mandatory writing prompt for the next class. I literally went straight to write it and completed it within a couple of hours later and sent it back to her to take a look at. I didn’t sleep that night and felt like a zombie for the rest of the day. But I felt good. Because I finished what I started. Then she replied to me earlier today with the most important thing for myself personally to go after; she mentioned about discipline. Which she can’t teach — nor anyone can teach, actually, I think. It’s just back to myself whether I want to make it or not. She did her part in teaching and motivating, but I also need to my part in doing it to make things actually happen.

This relates to the first day of orientation in my graduate school. When my program director mentioned about advice and expectation to succeed in MFA is time-management. I keep that in mind until now and am working on it until it’s literally working.

Which got me realized, it’s an essential part that I’m kind of missing as a graduate student. When I was still in undergrad, I wasn’t just a college student. I was a college athlete. Basically, I was partly student and partly athlete. But seriously, it was literally like a full-time job and I really enjoyed it and thankful that I went through it no matter how difficult it was at times. I was trained to do physical conditioning on top of my on-court tennis practices, 18 credits classes, and 10-hours per week on campus job. What I’m trying to get at is this; I did the cardio workouts, tennis hitting and so on to get stronger as a tennis player.

When I was still in undergrad, I wasn’t just a college student. I was a college athlete. Basically, I was partly student and partly athlete. But seriously, it was literally like a full-time job. I trained to do physical conditioning (that I didn’t really like most of the time because it was basically like a torture) on top of my on-court tennis practices, 18 credits classes, and 10-hours per week on campus job. Ok, I don’t want to show how busy my life was (and now, kind of) but what I wanted to address is; I did the cardio workouts, tennis hitting and so on to get stronger as a tennis player.

And now in graduate school, similar to my college tennis athlete situation, I want to go after is this; I want to work on the ‘physical conditioning’ in writing. Do you see what I’m saying?

But I realize in order to succeed in MFA and becoming a writer, I need several other parts to keep myself going. I’m a human, after all. So I came up with this lists;

IMG_3960

And I hope to myself that I commit to all these.

 

P.S spoiler alert: the featured image is not my desk; it was my best friend’s desk. But it was still my laptop on her desk.

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